Archive for the ‘Teamwork Tactics’ category

How Neuro-Linguistic Programming Helps You To Manage Your Human Resource Matters At The Workplace

September 27, 2008

I was invited to give a talk to a number of human resource mangers and leaders from various companies yesterday. The talk entitled, “Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP) Skills” enabled me to introduce to them the origin of NLP as well as sharing with them the various concepts and techniques that will empower them to become better HR managers.

The participants were highly interactive, fun-loving and made further enquires about this practical technology of human excellence. I was glad to provide the information which can direct them to what they are looking for. And their commitment to their jobs in implementing effective HR policies for their staffs earned my respect and salutation.

Similarly, when you apply the understanding of NLP technology and concepts unto your human resource matters and issues, you will discover that NLP:

1. Gives you specific strategies to build rapport and deepen relationships with the staffs at work, influencing them faster than before.

2. Guides you to better avoid, deflect and handle conflicts and tough situations arising from work.

3. Provides you the practical tools and relevant technology to better formulate human resource policies. It also takes you into effective implementation strategies that let your staff ‘buy-in’ to these policies or directives.

In short, NLP enables you to Excel Beyond Excellence!

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Now, Who’s Your Mentor? Exploring The Beauty Of Mentoring

September 25, 2008

Having been a Mentor to various individuals and certain organizations for years, I derived even greater insights than before on the essence of effective mentoring. This improvement concept does bring with it a myriad of benefits, and they are all beautiful benefits:

For the Mentee,

1. Mentoring shaves of years of unnecessary mistakes in the process, shortening the learning curve.

2. Mentoring brings to him the ‘insider’ and “behind the scene’ look at how the organizations and industry is like, really like.

3. Mentoring allows him to be specific in reducing his actual weaknesses and extending his strengths, giving him a more powerful advantage in whatever industry he is in.

For the Mentor,

4. Mentoring allows him to practice his leadership and coaching skills beyond where he is now.

5. Mentoring lets him play out and experiment different concepts of subjects that he already knew.

6. Mentoring brings to him a sense of satisfaction knowing that he has played a significant role in grooming and changing someone’s life for the better.

For the Organization,

7. Mentoring provides it a possible leadership and managerial succession plan and evolving line of command.

8. Mentoring allows the organization to discover hidden talents within the organization, with likelihood of greater loyalty from the individual.

9. Mentoring saves the organization money in retraining and orientating a total outsider and reduced wastage of resources.

Most of all,

10. Mentoring allows everybody to Excel Beyond Excellence!

Facilitating Thoughts: What Essential Items Must You Have BEFORE Your Meetings And Discussions Begin To Make The Sessions Fruitful

September 19, 2008

As you run your meetings, it’s imperative that the members are focused unto the meeting itself. Today, at the second day of “WITs Facilitators’ Course”, we kept these in perspectives as we discussed on the tough issues and essential items to apply in meetings.

One of the areas I got every participant to look at are the moments before the actual beginning of the meeting and discussions. These moments set the pace for the entire flow of the sessions, hence they warrant careful considerations.

In order to have a meaningful and fruitful session as facilitator-leader, here are the items that you must consider before your meetings and discussions begin:

1. Set the frame work and agenda of the meeting so everyone knows where the meeting is heading.

2. Get everyone to arrive prepared with their relevant information before the meeting begins.

3. Lay out the ground rules of the meeting where everybody must agree and abide.

5 Ways To Increase Your Leadership Emotional Intelligence

September 16, 2008

If you are a manager, director, supervisor and the similar titles, you will be in a position to exert your leadership over your team. However, just being in this position does not immediately entitle you to become a respected leader. You’ve got to demonstrate high level of emotional intelligence in leading, facilitating and influencing your members.

At today’s training on “Emotional Intelligence at Work For Leaders”, I explored in greater details what does it mean to have better emotional intelligence as a leader. Plenty of real-life examples and scenarios were brought out for discussions. In addition, I shared with my participants the practical yet simple strategies to apply at their workplace.

I was also very pleased that the leader-participants were interactive and contributed to the discussions as well as derive further learning. It’s my pleasure and honor indeed to be serving them as their trainer. I wish them the very best in their leadership and management journey.

Adding on, here are more ways you can increase your leadership emotional intelligence:

1. Have an in-depth understanding of your personal leadership styles and tendencies

2. Understand that your own leadership has it own strengths and weaknesses. Find out what they are and work on them conscientiously.

3. Be comfortable at confronting tough leadership situations and decision making under crisis.

4. Display artful tact, empathy and diplomacy when handling conflicts and sensitivity, especially with difficult people.

5. Discover how you can appreciate your team members, staffs and subordinates in different and sincere manners.

It’s Not Just About Work! 7 Areas You MUST REALLY Pay Attention To At Your Workplace For Your Own Career Excellence

September 8, 2008

At the beginning of this work week, it will be a helpful and enriching idea to start pondering about your career with respect to your life. Whenever I’m conducting coaching and counseling for group participants and individuals, I’ve highlighted that work is not just about work.

It’s a lot more. And you have to be aware of them or else your career outcome may not be as productive as you wish to be. In fact, merely putting your career on work alone tends to lead to stagnation at best and retardation of career at worse.

If you wish to know what are others must you really pay attention to, here are the areas:

1. The quality of your work and your competency, and not just merely work.

2. Your relationships with all the people in your life.

3. The way you communicate with your bosses, colleagues and customers and the way you serve them.

4. The clarity of your work responsibilities and your role.

5. The values that your presence bring.

6. Your personal career progress that fits your goals and dreams in life.

7. The overall fulfillment of the company’s objectives via your work performance.

How You Can Build Better Communities? 8 Steps For Effective Policy Implementation To The Masses

September 5, 2008

It was an extremely busy time for me yesterday. As a trainer, I was concluding Day 2 of the “Building Communities” training and was rushing afterwards to another venue to begin the private evening seminar on “What Men Want”. That made for a fast-paced day, fully enriching and exciting.

As discussed in my training, policies are there to ensure things get on to whatever goals the management wants to achieve. They are critical to how the future can progress. Be it in managing a club, a community, a town, a nation-country, global region or even for worldwide use, policies are there to keep things running in the intended direction. Challenging as it might be at times, they are essential. Hence the training for the past 2 days on “Building Communities” was designed to address this issue, ease the transitions and handle other situations that might arise.

Whenever you want to implement a certain policy to a large group of people, you can further make use of the following 8 steps:

Step #1: Study the ground’s feeling first by setting up the survey systems.

Step #2: Derive an understanding of the cultures and the people who will be affected by your policies.

Step #3: Decide on two levels of perspectives: The short term and the long term. (You may find that sometimes one contradicts another.) You have to make the call on which position to take.

Step #4: Establish bridges and connections with the communities that will be affected. Inform everybody about these bridges.

Step #5: Keep the communication channels flowing back and forth as events and policies evolve.

Step #6: Craft the proper promotion strategy and branding process.

Step #7: Monitor the situation for minor fine-tuning yet ensuring the main plan is being adhere to.

Step #8: Remain vigilant in responding to any changes and be the listening ear for the communities.

Whenever usefully policies are effective implemented, the benefits to the communities are tremendous. Hence, the artful application of the above steps will make your management impressive and the outcome Excel Beyond Excellence!

7 Timely Reminders For The Leaders

September 3, 2008

There’s another of my Supervisory Leadership training that is being conducted over these 2 days. I regard leadership training as a fundamental requirement and leadership as a highly essential and relevant skill for any organization. Without effective leadership, an organization remains stagnant, unable to move beyond or further its cause.

Hence, for the leaders, here are some timely reminders that we can all work on:

1. Time to listen to your staffs: How are they taking to their work?

2. Time to be sensitive: Do you know how things are going on around you?

3. Time to be flexible: Are you adapting to the changing circumstances?

4. Time to build deeper rapport: Are the working relationship between you and your staffs better than before? Do customers trust you more than ever?

5. Time to review your organization: Is this the optimum structure you are running?

6. Time to reflect: Is this the best you can be as the Leader?

7. Time to excel: Are you taking your team to the next level?

How To Become An Effective Leader In Extreme Situations?

July 28, 2008

The tireless leader faces different challenges every single day. These challenges and issues range from the most mundane to the most critical of circumstances. Nonetheless, decisions have to be made, stands have to be taken and actions are to be implemented. This happens no matter how crucial and urgent the situation is. It’s all in a day’s work for the most ferocious of leaders.

A report in Today’s paper presented an interesting and insightful article that reflected this topic: On how can a leader face the most extreme situations. Lyndon Rego, an Innovation Incubator Director, espouses this responsibility of the leader, that he must face it and work it out, sometimes with bold moves.

Here are the details of his report:

How To Become An Effective Leader In Extreme Situations?

CRISIS, as anyone who has been through one would know, forces people to think and behave in new ways. Extreme crisis exponentially ratchets up that response.

Crisis response requires both planning and improvising. Planning and preparation helps enable rapid coordinated action. At the same time, plans are always insufficient.

A plan is a starting point, but every situation will involve something unexpected. Your logic and imagination cannot factor in every contingency. People need the capacity to read and understand a situation and improvise their approach as the reality unfolds.

Taking into account some of the lessons learnt by those who have faced extreme crisis can better prepare you for such situations.

SySteMS fail

Infrastructure, technology, alert mechanisms and communication may fail or be insufficient. Processes fall apart, leaving you in unfamiliar territory. The failures may be brief or long-lasting, confined or extensive. Ongoing or systemic problems, while manageable in routine circumstances, may be a serious problem in a crisis.

tHe picture iS diStorted

No one has a complete picture of what is happening. People on the outside may have a sense of the big picture but may lack accurate, detailed and critical information from within the crisis zone. In contrast, people in the middle of the crisis see what is in front of them but may be cut off from what is taking place elsewhere.

tiMe iS coMpreSSed

Moving forward or tackling a part of the problem may be risky in the absence of solid information, but doing nothing is not a choice. As the crisis evolves beyond the immediate, the time pressure eases, only to be replaced by the complex demands of a protracted crisis or recovery.

autHority iS liMited

A crisis can easily trump existing structures of authority. Whoever is “in charge” is whoever is there. If organizational protocols require strict adherence to command structure and approvals, they may hinder rapid and effective responses.

new leaderSHip eMergeS

A crisis will generate previously unexpected and unknown leadership capabilities. Individuals will step up to rescue or respond. New organizations and networks rise to provide aid and assistance.

preparing to face criSiS

How does an organization prepare people to do what it takes during a crisis? What is it that allows people to do extraordinary, unexpected things that are outside of their experience and training? When it comes to facing a crisis it is about your people and your leadership. It is about organizational culture.

Organizations and individuals will be better equipped for crisis (and daily operations) when executives and managers act and speak in ways that:

1. Forge relationships. Personal connections and good relationships are literally lifesavers in a crisis. Build quality relationships with a broad base of stakeholders before a crisis. Make it a priority to behave in ways that build trust in you and in the organization. Show respect for others and demand others to behave in ways that show respect, too.

2. Develop flexibility. Build a culture of flexibility and adaptability. Emphasize action-taking and good judgment.

3. Encourage courage. Show you are willing to stand up for the courage of your convictions.

4. Support risk-taking. People make mistakes; they will make mistakes during a crisis, too. Establish a culture that supports good-faith risk taking. When people act with integrity for the organization and the mission, the need to know they will not be penalized or made scapegoats.

5. Enable empowerment. Insist that local leaders make decisions based on the situations they face. Educate them and support them along the way. You cannot hold on to authority when times are good and then assume people will be empowered in a crisis.

How Do You Know Your Leadership Influence and Management Strategies Have Performed Well? 7 Signs To Show Your Success

July 8, 2008

Over these past two days of training, my participants and I have been discussing and uncovering the various dynamics of leading and the art of influencing people towards the goals. Making the organizational leadership perform well is absolutely crucial to work success. This was what the “Supervisory Leadership” training is specifically designed to address and to provide the solutions in leadership management.

There were some pretty intensive practices and in-depth analysis into what leadership and management truly is and how leadership takes on other paradigms apart from what seems conventional. In the midst of the thoughts, discussions and reflections, everybody got to acquire new knowledge and skills. Most of all, the attitudes of a leader was vividly exhibited.

Therefore, as you carry forth your leadership strategies as well as to manage your staffs, you want to know if all your efforts have been worthwhile. It will definitely stand your department and you in good stead to know that these strategies and influence have performed well.

Here are the indications and signs of your leadership and management success:

1. Your staff and team members reflect the traits and values of your leadership influences and management ideologies.

2. They are pleased to have worked with you, as their leader.

3. Your staffs begin to train other staffs, using your philosophy and take on your legacy. (Note: This is apart from an instituted training policy, but rather an additional attitudinal display of your influence.)

4. There is an overall synergy and enthusiastic mood within your uplifted team.

5. Your staffs are willing to talk openly about it and the benefits your strategies bring.

6. Your customers return consistently to your organization with positive feedback.

7. The numbers and data show the differences. (It better.)

When you take on the responsibility of leading your team, your strategies will result in various impact. Read your organization for the above signs and you will be better poised on the road to Excel Beyond Excellence!

3 Useful Ways To Handle Your Verbal Critics

July 1, 2008

Tonight at my Club meeting, I was evaluating the Advanced project on “Diffusing Verbal Criticism” from the Interpersonal Communication manual. At The NUS Toastmasters Club, we always strive to make the project a meaning learning experience for the speakers. I’ve also throughout enjoyed such a project because it is a reflection of the daily relationships between people. Criticisms can be widespread and when left unchecked, becomes a part of a damaging culture.

This project also brings to mind my trainings on human relationships, interactions and behaviors. Whenever people come together and mingle, there is always potential for outspoken criticisms to occur. It’s sometimes unavoidable but definitely manageable.

Hence some of the useful ways I’ve recommended for both the speech project and our daily interactions are as follows:

1. Listen while observing. Know when the right time to interject your opinions is. When you attempt to cut a person off too soon, that critic will not be ready to take it lying down while you defend yourself.

2. Acknowledge the emotions displayed instead of claiming to merely ‘understand’. People often seek validation that the common ‘lip service’ or respond.

3. Minimize unproductive phrases such as I don’t know or I’ll try. These phrases might sometimes add fuel to the fire. Work on solution phrases such as ‘This is what I can do’, or ‘let’s discuss the issues openly’.