Archive for the ‘Public Speaking Success’ category

6 Proven Methods To Make A Dry Training Session Come Alive

April 4, 2009

There are times whereby you have to conduct trainings that are highly technical, theoretical or academic-based. To a trainer, one of the first few considerations in such seminars include how to work with the participants without losing their attention or having them dozing off. A challenge worth taking on indeed.

As the training engagements came in, I’ve encountered the different training subjects that provided varying levels of complexity. Not only is one limited by training time, there are also a number of constraints that affect the outcome and quality of the training. When the topics demand such rigorous examination, the audience interaction may need to be better planned and balanced. One must create some ways to make the training come alive and with vibrancy.

Hence, here are some quick tips I can offer you when you are faced with dry training sessions:

1. Address the WIIFM: What’s In It for Me. Make them accept and understand the importance of your topic to their work.

2. Share captivating personal examples and stories. This will make them sit up and listen to you instead of just being focus on the bullet points. For example, when you point out a concept, share the stories after that on how you applied the concepts.

3. Make your PowerPoint slides interesting to view. You can use graphics and filling it with colors. Test out your PowerPoint to ensure they get the point across yet can be interesting to look at. (This is mostly applicable for dry topics. For soft skills, it must be to tone it down instead.)

4. Keep the information simple unless this is a full academic course requiring close examination, keep the concepts easy on the ear and just highlight the major points. The details can be read by them in the notes. It’s not that you are under performing, it’s that human mind cannot take in so much deep information at one go. If you must go heavy, may sure you spread out the deep academic contents through the trainings.

5. Energizers are also useful whenever you see the energy and enthusiasm dipping. They can go beyond mere clips and can include mini exercises such as head rotation and arm stretching.

6. Vary your tone, body language and delivery to keep the audience glued to your “performance”. Grab their attention with jokes, quizzes and mini-rewards if you wish. Let them know you are the ‘star of the moment’.

(Source: wekie.com)

Advertisements

7 Important Things You Must Know To Excel In Your Table Topics

February 1, 2009

When I stepped into the auditorium yesterday, the enthusiastic mood of the audience filled the air. Indeed, they were present to learn and acquire the art of public speaking. The fervor to learn was undeniable. You will be inspired by their passion and touched by their willingness to improve.

As I presented my workshop on “Table Topics Triumph”, I could see all of the participants gripping on to their pens, ready to note down the various pointers that I would cover. When I asked for their suggestions for table topics, the willing hands would raise up. We were never short of ideas when it came to topics. I liked that.

Most of all, I take honor in having the privilege to contribute my knowledge, expertise and services to the participants. I appreciate them coming forth with enquiries and their answers to my questions. This is what sharing is all about. We grow together.

Adding on, there are important things that can further help you if being excellent in Table Topics is your aim:

1. The audience is smart. Never underestimate the people you are addressing nor look down on them. Treat them with worth and respect.

2. Remember to answer the question. Instead of getting too carried away with your opinions, get back to attention to the topic eventually.

3. Ensure that there is a logical flow to your speech. In the midst of time pressure, it’s easy to be way too scattered with your speech. Keep it flowing smoothly.

4. Avoid the dreaded awkward introduction where the audience knows that you are unsure. This usually serves as a major obstacle to an otherwise great speech. Stand your ground on this.

5. Use the stage positions to display compare and contrast if required in your speech. This will enable your audience to differentiate your points within a very short time in a quick duration of your speech.

6. Let the topic drive your speech and its content. In this way, your entire speech will come across as more coherent and answering to the topic.

7. Know that there are always multiple angles to approach the topics. Short of being too absolute, topics can truly be answered from more than one methodology. Work on showing your perspectives of the topic, allowing it to make sense with the audience.

At the end of it all, it’s ultimately your show. To put up a positive display of your speaking prowess, correct and constant practice is essential.

Here are my best wishes. May your speeches always Excel Beyond Excellence!

(Source: wekie.com)

When The Boss Speaks: How Should You, The Management, Make A Speech So Your Staffs Will Listen. (7 Proven Pointers To Guide You Through)

November 22, 2008

As long as you are holding the managerial position, you will eventually find yourself having to give talks to your staffs. By default of the fact that you are a manger or a leader, you have to deal with people. Whenever it comes to working with others, relationships, emotions, opinions come into the picture. You cannot avoid this. It’s all part of the art of working together.

Whenever I coach the managers and top executives individually or in a group, I help them to better craft their speeches to further appeal to their staffs. I call this “Leadership and Management Talk”. After all, the power of public speaking by leaders can never be discounted. They should never be taken lightly at all.

Think of how the US President-elect Barack Obama triumphed in the recent Presidential Election and won the massive numbers of voters over with his power of eloquence, thrilling and inspiring the audience in the process.

Should you work on these forms of leadership talk, I’m sure you will benefit greatly as a result. It will absolutely augur well for you as a manager, a leader, or both.

Therefore when you, the boss, speak, consider the following pointers:

1. The speech is really about them. When your staffs are willing to work well as a result of your speech, then can the company take off.

2. Keep your points smooth and flowing. Make it easy to listen to, absorb and understand what you want them to know.

3. Avoid mixing up the issues and over interfacing them with multiple layers of problematic discussions. Focus on one point at a time, please.

4. In your speech, let them know that you do care for their wellbeing, really. And show full sincerity.

5. Raise examples from their own job situations, instead of asking them to understand yours. People usually see from their own points, not others.

6. Include an avenue where they can see or air their views with you. Remember, outlet, outlet, outlet. People need a channel for let go and to give out emotional concerns.

7. Conclude with an uplifting note. Every staff in his company wants to know that the future of the company is secure, hence so is his job. Even if you have to let some of them go, show them another better future.

(Source: wekie.com)

Ignore Them At Your Own Risk! Exploring The 5 Essence Of Managing Your Conflicts Without Making Them Worse

November 12, 2008

As I approached this training topic over the past 2 days, I’ve derived even more ways of handling conflicting situations and tough people. What I’ve always liked about “Conflict Management” workshops are the freshness and renewed challenges that keep presenting themselves.

What did I do? I basically encouraged the participants to explore the tough conflicts with me.

And throughout these interactions, I helped them to design the different approaches that they can use whenever the conflicts arise. It’s never a quick hit-and-run solution if you want to get to the root of the issue, but there are truly some words and approaches that can put you in a more positive light.

Do reflect and consider the following essence of conflict management:

1. When people get angry, they are exhibiting a inner set of conflicting values. These values often, though not always, have been accumulated over time. You want to recognize that in you.

2. Conflicting people want to be heard, and seriously do not appreciate receiving any condescending treatment.

3. They are also seeking support of some kind for their points of views. Notice when the areas of similarity might be for both your viewpoints.

4. These people have either an overly high or overly hurt ego of some kind and want to assert it unto people around them. Handle their egos with care!

5. Avoid getting too carried away to prove yourself right, because that’s exactly what conflicts can get you to do — get carried away and your conflict escalates.

(Source: wekie.com)

How To Integrate Leadership Communication Into Your Interaction With People

November 9, 2008

I completed the first segment of the training yesterday with a sense of satisfaction. Although it was Saturday, I was glad the participant-leaders were able to be dedicating their time to better themselves. After all, this course “Communication and Problem Solving for Leaders” was specifically customized for them.

We had a fair bit of in-depth discussion on what it meant for a leader to communicate. I call this “Leadership Communication”. The participants understood that the manners and style of communication were also very much affected by the leader’s personality. Hence, I was pleased when the leaders were able to integrate the various concepts into their practice.

When we explored the concepts of leadership communication, we also derived various ways of displaying them at work.

Here are some of them:

1. Understand how your staffs prefer to interact and communicate.

2. Discuss with them your corporate goals with values and how you are going to lead them to fulfill these objectives.

3. Seek to inspire them by communicating trust in their capabilities.

4. Remember that one key element of communication is listening, active listening.

5. Let your staff know that you understand them by communicating with empathy and your willingness to adopt possible, workable ideas.

(Source: wekie.com)

How Young People Can Be Set On The Path To Public Speaking Success

November 2, 2008

Many students are starting to realize the importance of public speaking and being able to communicate effectively. I’ve been training in different schools and individual students over the years in subjects such as these. The consistent sign I notice is the awareness and the discovery on the benefits that public speaking can bring to themselves.

As I coached and guided my students during Speech Coaching last night, I could notice how serious they were in wanting to become better in the art of oratorical speaking. The firm determination to better their speeches made me want to contribute even more, share with them a lot deeper in mastering public speaking.

For those who are interested unto the road of speaking success, here are some recommendations:

1. Seek understanding and support from your loved ones, especially your parents.

2. Join a public speaking training or a special interest program like The Toastmasters or The Gavel Clubs.

3. Seek out a personal mentor who can massively shorten your learning curve.

4. Listen and learn from the more experienced speakers often.

5. Find opportunities to speak regularly. It’s a skill you must hone consistently, never something acquired overnight. Nothing beats practice. You can’t replace correct practice.

(Source: wekie.com)

3 Crucial Questions To Ask Yourself Before You Use Any Powerpoint Slides In Your Presentation

October 29, 2008

I was impressed when The National University of Singapore Toastmasters Club initiated a discussion group last night to talk about issues regarding public speaking. A substantial number of people turned up for the event and participated in airing their views. This shows that our members do take ardent interest in the act of continuous improvement and learning.

As we know, there were way too many questions to answer regarding giving presentation. Needless to say, that short period of time during the discussion certainly well utilized and uplifted everyone’s spirit.

One of the key topics that were being brought up, to a large extend, involved using Powerpoint slides during presentations. The participants were concerned about how the slides will impact them.

Adding on, here are the crucial questions that will help you regarding the use of slides:

1. What is the purpose of this Powerpoint slide?

2. Does the use of this aid you or distract you from your presentation?

3. What is the take-home message for the audience after viewing the slides?

Use these questions to further streamline between to use slides ot not, as well as how to use them suitably. This will sure make your presentation sparkle.

(Source: wekie.com)